Contact Us:
Office (360) 427-9670 ext. 207
Mon - Fri

Deputy Director Utilities and Waste (360) 427-9670 ext. 652

The Solid Waste Program is part of the Utilities and Waste Management Division of Mason County's Public Works Department.

 
 

Top Ten Tips for Saving Water

 
Be water wise
 
Water is essential to our everyday lives. The average person in the U.S. uses between 80-100 gallons of water per day! but, our supplies are limited…only 1% of the earth's water is available for drinking…so please use water wisely. Cutting water use inside and outside our homes is really important. If each of us changed our water-use habits, we could save billions of gallons of water. Here's how you can help:
 

Indoor

What you can do: How much you can save:
  • Wash only full loads of laundry and dishes
Saves up to 50 gallons per week
  • Fix household leaks promptly
Saves up to 20 gallons per day
  • Spend only 5 minutes in the shower
Saves up to 8 gallons each time
  • Turn off the water while you brush your teeth

Saves up to 2.5 gallons per minute

 

Outdoor

What you can do: How much you can save:
  • Water your lawn 1 to 2 days a week instead of 5

Saves up to 840 gallons per week

  • Check your sprinkler system for leaks, overspray and broken sprinkler heads and repair promptly
Saves up to 500 gallons per month
  • Use a broom instead of a hose to clean driveways
    and sidewalks
Saves up to 150 gallons each time
  • Install a smart sprinkler controller that adjusts watering based on weather, soil type, amount of shade and plant type
Saves up to 40 gallons per day
  • Water your plants in the early morning or evening to
    reduce evaporation and ineffective watering due to wind
Saves up to 25 gallons each time
  • Mulch around plants to reduce evaporation.
Saves hundreds of gallons a year
 
 
why waste itDid You Know? Water dissolves more substances than any other liquid. Wherever it travels, water carries chemicals, minerals and nutrients with it. Many chemicals cannot be treated at sewage treatment plants and end up in out lakes, rivers and salt water. Take toxic chemicals to a household hazardous waste facility rather than dumping it down the drain.